The Quiet Side Of The Tetons
DriggsVictorTetonia


Teton Valley - Images by Daryl Hunter

There may be no place prettier to farm than in Teton Valley Idaho

Idaho's Teton Valley lies, snug against the 13,000' peaks of the Grand Teton Range, Along the eastern border of Idaho, a border it shares with Wyoming. Teton Valley shares the Grand Tetons with our neighboring valley to the east, the more famous, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Folks describe Teton Valley as and its towns Victor, Driggs, and Tetonia "The quiet side of the Tetons."

Teton Valley has good access to three National Forests and two National Parks - Grand Teton and Yellowstone. The indigenous wildflowers, wildlife and the Grand Tetons provide the ideal backdrop for day hikes, horseback riding, mountain biking, or a quiet river float. Other activities include golfing, whitewater rafting, and melodrama and the Grand Targhee Ski and Summer Resort.

While Jackson Hole to the east has mushroomed into a tourist megalopolis, the rustic communities of the Valley, on the western flank of the Tetons, has managed to develop its own character as it has morphed into an outdoors-adventure capital. The charming towns of Victor, Driggs and Tetonia are the Idaho communities of Teton and Alta Wyoming is also in the Valley.

The Grand Teton Range rises majestically over the Valley to the east, and the Big Hole Mountains, home to some of the region's best single-track mountain biking, flank the valley on the west. Many trekkers use trails in the Jedadiah Smith Wilderness to access Grand Teton National Park, particularly the park's northern peaks.

Hay farm, Alta Wyoming. The argiculture of Teton Valley compliments the majesty of the Grand Tetons.

Teton Valley is the gateway to the Grand Targhee Ski and Summer Resort, and many canyons lead into prime backcountry for hiking or skiing. In the summer, anglers wet a fly on the valley's Teton River, cowboys and cowgirls ride to their hearts' content, and Tetonia hosts a rodeo, Driggs launches its annual Hot Air Balloon Festival, and Victor lights up Independence Day with a parade and fireworks. One of the biggest events of the summer, though, occurs in August when the Targhee Bluegrass Festival takes over the slopes of the Grand Targhee Resort.

Friendly and unpretentious, Teton Valley is for people who love the mountains enough to live, work, and play in them-including many service-industry stiffs who keep Jackson running but can't afford to live there.

6,500+ people call Teton Valley home at an elevation of 6200 ft. World class powder skiing and snowmobiling, horseback riding, fly fishing, golf, hiking, rock climbing, mountain biking, camping, rafting, hunting, and much, more are available in the area.

The jagged, snow-capped Tetons to the east and the rolling Big Hole Mountains to the west cradle the gentle, flat course of the Teton River. Teton Valley fly-fishing has become a tradition of providing quality dry fly fishing for tens of thousands of fishermen in Idaho and is destination-fishing resort for people the world over.

Yellowstone News

James Walks Along gets kicked out of Wyoming Game and fish grizzly bear meeting
At a Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee / Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee meeting last week, James Walks Along who is the historic preservation officer for the Northern Cheyenne tribe, was thrown off the stage and refused opportunity to speak on behalf of his tribe. Photo courtesy of GOAL Tribal Coalition

Tribes 'disrespected' by federal and state officials in Grizzly Bear delisting fight
By Elizabeth Wolf

CODY, Wyo. – James Walks Along was forced to abandon an address to the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee (YES) of the joint federal and state Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) by Brian Nesvik, IGBC Chair and Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) Wildlife Division Chief, at the committee's spring meeting in Cody, Wyoming.

As usual, the government doesn't give a crap about America's Natives. ................... Rest of Story

Publisher's note:  The government isn't going to let anyone stand in their way of delisting grizzy bears because hunts will sell for $30,000 and money trumps nature.

 

The extreme DISRESPECT shown to the Northern Cheyenne Nation by Wyoming State public officials, extended across Indian Country to all nations as James Walks Along ( a THPO representative speaking on behalf of his tribal president) was asked to leave.

At the YES-IGBC spring meeting in Cody, WY, Dan Thompson of Wyoming Game and Fish gave a presentation entitled '"Grizzly Bear Management on Tribal Lands - Collaborations between WGFD, USFWS, and IGBST." There was no tribal input to the presentation, but alarmingly, when James Walks Along rose on behalf of the Northern Cheyenne tribal government, to present their recently passed tribal resolution, his microphone was unplugged and he was told to get off the stage.

James Walks Along later said... "I was shocked by the disrespect I received from the Fish and Wildlife Service. They disrespected me and my tribe by not allowing me to read the Northern Cheyenne tribe's resolution in opposition to delisting and trophy hunting the grizzly bear... They literally pulled the plug on me and escorted me out. Men approached me and I felt like I was being threatened. I was expecting security to escort me out, and that's the first time anything like that has happened to me. This showed disdain toward the government to government process, and it was disrespectful to all tribes.

The Bears are out

Spring his sprung and the bears are roaming the lowlands.  May and June are the best times for bear viewing before the bears head for the high country were we have so few roads.

Snowy grizzly bear family, Grand teton National Park
Two Wolves, Grand Teton National Park, Grand Tetons

Wolf pack is biggest in West

The largest wolf pack known to exist in the American West roams the Gros Ventre hill country about 30 miles northeast of Jackson.
At last count there were 24 members of the Lava Mountain Pack, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service annual monitoring reports show. While far from unprecedented historically, a wolf pack two dozen strong has nine more members than any other pack surveyed this year in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington or Oregon, state and federal reports indicate. "That's a very large pack," said Mike Jimenez, the service's Northern Rocky Mountain wolf coordinator.----------> rest of story

A Case for Collars • By Keith Crowley

As a wildlife photographer I have a real love/hate relationship with radio telemetry collars.  All photographers live in a world of aesthetics, and most wildlife photographers try capture natural animal behavior in natural settings with as little apparent human influence as possible. Even something as ephemeral as a jet's vapor trail in the sky can destroy a wild image. The permanence of collars (and ear tags, too) placed by human hands on wild animals is impossible to ignore.......................For my part, I think are few truly valid reasons not to collar wolves in Yellowstone. But there is also one really good one, and in the interest of open discussion, some points are worth exploring:..............rest of story

wolf photo gallery, wolf photos for sale

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

Helpful ebook for photographers

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

Yellowstone National Park: highlights

Locals like to say there's never a bad day in Yellowstone. But some activities are better than others. Near the top of my list is a slow drive along the north shore of Yellowstone Lake. The easy trail to Storm Point is worth a half hour's walk, or more if the wind is calm and the boulders are comfortable for sitting. A few miles east, a side road leads to Lake Butte Overlook which offers views across North America's largest alpine lake to the Teton range 100 miles south. This is a good place to be at sunset........................ rest of story

Yellowstone Volcano Warning?

Yellowstone National Park is fighting viral rumors that the park's bison are fleeing an impending supervolcano eruption. Officials told Reuters that they've been fielding dozens of calls and emails since a video of galloping bison went viral this week in the wake of an earthquake at Yellowstone. They said the video actually shows the animals running down a paved road that leads deeper into the park................. rest of story

Grand Prismatic spring panorama, print for sale
Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest hot spring in Yellowstone National Park
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