jumping trout
Bookmark and Share

This Page

Red Lodge Montana

Beartooth Mountains

Absaroka Lake, Beartooth Highway, Red Lodge Montana
Absaroka Lake, Beartooth Highway south of Red Lodge Montana

Red Lodge, Montana is one of several gateways to Yellowstone Park however, it is the only gateway that has the beautiful Beartooth Highway as the gate. Come and experience true western hospitality in this quaint, historic, mountain town. Today, Red Lodge is still a working agricultural town. Thanks in no small part to the town’s preservation of and appreciation for its colorful past, it’s also a fascinating destination where history is not so much a thing of the past as it is a vibrant part of the present.

Red Lodge features beautiful ranch lands, flowing rivers, spring creeks, and abundant wildlife. Mule deer enjoy the open range and grasslands available to them in outside Red Lodge, Yellowstone elk come down from the mountain tops to spend the winters, grizzly bears often visit to provide a thrill or a scare, moose are also abundant and wolves wander in and out of the valley.

Outdoor recreation Red Lodge is well known for many outdoor recreation opportunities: skiing, mountain biking, and backpacking are nearby. In April, it is host to the popular Peaks to Prairie triathlon.

fishing littel bear lake, beartooth mountains
Scott Hunter releasing Brook Trout back into Little Bear Lake in the Beartooth Mountains.

Downhill skiing is the main attraction in winter; Red Lodge Mountain Resort has a long history dating back to 1960 when the ski area first opened. Originally started by a local enthusiastic ski club, they have spent the last 50 years growing into a resort that attracts visitors and families from all over the country. For those who seek an uncrowded, authentic ski experience where one can truly relax and have fun.

When the snow melts, the action moves to Red Lodge Mountain Resort’s 18-hole golf course that’s at the base of the Beartooth Mountains with miles of views that will make it hard to keep your eye on the ball!

The close proximity to Yellowstone Park, the Beartooth Highway and many other natural wonders make Red Lodge the perfect place to vacation or live. Besides having the legendary fly-fishing Yellowstone River not far away World class big game hunting, whitewater rafting, kayaking, wildlife viewing and photography, hiking, camping and horseback riding are just a few of the unlimited recreational opportunities available here in Red Lodge. Many fine bed and breakfasts; cabins and guest ranches provide lots of options for fine lodging.

Climbing is popular in Red Lodges Absaroka/Beartooth Mountains, Montana's highest peak, Granite Peak at 12,799 is a popular climb for many and there are many challenging climbing routes in rugged, remote wilderness locales on many classic routes in the Beartooth District.

Red Lodge’s creeks, rivers, and alpine lakes are treats to experience, fishing is popular because it is so good on the Yellowstone, Stillwater, Rock Creek, and the many lakes the dot the Beartooth Highway.

Whitewater river trips and kayaking on the Stillwater River near Absarokee, Montana, approximately 40 minutes from Red Lodge are a popular activity.

There is plenty to do and see in Red Lodge and is a dang good stop on your way to Yellowstone.

old cowboy
The face of the west is changeing and I don't like what I see

Sadly it appears as though Red Lodge is going down this road

The Resort Town Curse by Daryl L. Hunter

In 1962 as a child my family went through Carmel California and after my exclaimation how wonderful the place was, my mother explained to me that it was against the law to cut down a tree in the town and it was so beautiful I wondered why every town didn't do that...........A few years later my hometown did enact all kinds of restricted zoning like Carmel's and now I couldn't afford to move back there if I wanted to. This town is now populated with what they call "Grey Gold", rich retired people that ran up the property values so high that native born could no longer afford to live there.............I have lived in many resort towns since, and I have noticed a trend. I am attracted to them when they are still little, quaint and undiscovered, but it usually isn't long before word spreads about the next great place. ...............The newcomers arrive and they marvel at the scenery, but yearn for a classier looking town. Then comes the planning and zoning like they had back home. Everyone's property value goes up and everyone is happy. ............ rest of article

 

Yellowstone News

Big water this runnoff,

Here Mark Bryson  of  Snake River Photo, captured a raft that met the wrath of the Snake River at 27,000 cubic feet per second.  If you are running the Snake River Mark Bryson likely has a photo of you, check out Snake River Photo

Capsizing whitewater raft, Snake River, Jackson Hole Wyoming

Grizzly Bear and cub, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Bridger Teton National Forest

Most of the Yellowstone gates are open for 2017 and grizzly bears are being seen

White female of the Canyon Pack has been killed.

Park staff investigated the situation and concluded the wolf was in shock and dying from the injuries. “Staff on scene agreed the animal could not be saved due to the severity of its injuries. The decision was made to kill the animal and investigate the cause of the initial trauma,” said P.J. White, Chief of the Wildlife and Aquatic Resources Branch. At this time, the nature of the initial injuries is unknown. An investigation into the cause of the injuries has begun which will include a necropsy.
 
Park staff identified the wolf as the white alpha female of the Canyon Pack, one of three known white wolves in the park. This wolf lived to 12 years, twice the age of an average wolf in the park and had a broad range that extended from Hayden Valley to the Firehole River area to the northern portion of the park. For these reasons, the wolf was one of the most recognizable and sought after by visitors to view and photograph.

Wolves eating bison carcass at the Gibbon River
Wolves sharing a meal

Anyone with information about this incident is encouraged to call the Yellowstone National Park Tip Line at 307-344-2132 or e-mail us. For more information, visit http://go.nps.gov/tipline.
 
The park will provide more information about the investigation when it is available.  

Wolf haters around the region are sipping champaign and toasting each other, I though will no longer be able to share the joy  showing this wolf to my Yellowstone visitors who have always dreamed of seeing a wolf in the wild.

I get it, wolves eat elk outfitters would like to sell to tourist hunters, and they eat some cows; hoever, these loses don't compare to the losses of the revenue grizzlies and wolves bring to their own neighbors in the tourst industry.  Oh well.

Montana, Wyoming and Idaho Game ad Fish's plan to screw the grizzlies

Wyoming, Montana and Idaho officials contend that federal wildlife managers are overstepping their authority by requiring that grizzly bear hunting regulations be put in place before final “delisting” of the species. The directors of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks jointly urged the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to do away with a focus on hunting in a proposed grizzly delisting rule that’s now on the table. ....... Jackson Hole News and Gude article here.

Montana, Wyoming and Idaho Game ad Fish's protest to get rid of federal oversight so they can kill grizzlies as they see fit...........  Read PDF Here

Momma grizzly, baby grizzly, swimming, grizzly sow, and cub
Grizzly 399 and her cub swimming in roadside pond
http://www.grizzlytimes.org/#!Partisan-Scientists-in-Public-Service-I-The-Strange-Case-of-the-Interagency-Grizzly-Bear-Study-Team/c1ou2/56fd9f780cf2b279cdbaa208
Yellowstone Grizzly Bear

Partisan Scientists in Public Service I: The Strange Case of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

(Pull Qoute) Interestingly enough, Chris Servheen has a doctorate in wildlife ecology. Moreover, the IGBST scientists at the time, led by Dr. Charles Schwartz, were deeply involved with and fully complicit in, not only putting together the 2007 delisting Rule, but also in crafting court briefs. In other words, ignorance or lack of education can't be plausibly invoked as an explanation for why the government scientists involved in authoring the 2007 Rule so egregiously misrepresented the relevant science................. rest of article

A Protective Firewall For Grizzlies

The delisting of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear is imminent and this we should celebrate (''''dancing''''). Now that our happy dance is complete, we must ensure the grizzlies' recovery is permanent. To ensure "continuity of achievement," the grizzlies need a firewall to protect the success of this achievement from human foible.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee was formed in 1983 to help ensure recovery of viable grizzly bear populations and their habitat in the lower 48 states through interagency coordination of policy, planning, management, and research. Many people have been working on this recovery for decades, for some; it has been most of their career. I can understand why the delisting of the grizzly before their retirement is their goal. A metaphorical gold watch if you will.

Many will argue differently,............................. Rest of Article

Blondie the Grizzly Bear and her three cubs
Blondie the Grizzly Sow and her three cubs, where these four bears roam in the Teton Wilderness is likely to open to hunting someday soon, this must not happen.

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

Helpful ebook for photographers

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

 

Custom Search