Paradise Valley thunderstorm, rainbow, fall colors and the Yellowstone River
Buckskin horse, red barn, paradise valley montana
A Paradise Valley Farm

This gem on the northern border of Yellowstone received It's named “Paradise Valley” for good reason, this premier Montana vacation spot has perfect summers and mild winters with spectacular views of th Absaroka and Gallatin mountain ranges under the famed Montana "big sky." The close proximity to Yellowstone Park; the Beartooth Highway and many other natural wonders make Paradise Valley the perfect place to vacation. Besides having the legendary fly-fishing river “The Yellowstone” flowing through its center, world class spring creeks; private lakes and other fishing streams draw anglers from around the world. World class big game hunting, whitewater rafting, kayaking, wildlife viewing and photography, hiking, camping and horseback riding are just a few of the unlimited recreational opportunities available here in Paradise Valley. Many fine Bed and Breakfasts, cabins and guest ranches provide lots of options for fine lodging.

Fall colors and the Yellowstone River in Paradise Valley Montana
The Yellowstone River is the center piece of Paradise Valley.

Emigrant peak casts a broad shadow over the valley. The scene of such recent movies as “A River Runs Through It” and “The Horse Whisperer”, Paradise Valley has its unique share of both trophy homes and deep rooted ranches and farms. Much like Pikes Peak on the front range of Colorado, Emigrant Peak is often framed in the large living room windows of the homes belonging to those lucky enough to live or visit such a wonderful place. Climbers find a world of wonder in the neighboring peaks in the Northern Absaroka Mountains including Mount Cowen, Black Mountain, the Pyramid, Crow Mountain, Chico Peak, Marten Peak and Mount Wallace.

Paradise Valley is situated in southwestern Montana. It is located just north of Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Montana, which lends its name to the county. Mule deer enjoy the open range and grasslands available to them in Paradise Valley. Paradise Valley extends from the Yellowstone gateway community of Gardiner at the south end, to historic Livingston on the north. Appropriately named, this region is a "paradise" to Montana and to the Rocky Mountains. Providing a unique backdrop of snowcapped peaks, the valley features beautiful ranchlands, flowing rivers, spring creeks and abundant wildlife.

The Bozeman Pass separates Paradise Valley from the Gallatin Valley and Bozeman; MT. Interstate 90 passes through both communities. The valley lies predominantly along a north-south axis, and is anchored to the north by Livingston, Montana, and to the south by Yankee Jim Canyon, approximately fifteen miles north of Gardiner, Montana and the north entrance of Yellowstone Park. US Highway 89 passes through the valley and into Yellowstone National Park. The Paradise Valley was the original entrance to Yellowstone.

Big Ranibow Trout fly-fishermen floating down Yellowstone River in drift boat as they fish for trout
Fish like this one make fly-fishermen return to Paradise Valley's Yellowstone River and famous spring creeksyear after year.
fly-fishermen floating down Yellowstone River in drift boat as they fish for trout

The Yellowstone River is noted for world-class fly-fishing in the river and nearby spring creeks such as DePuy Spring Creek. The valley hosts other natural wonders such as several natural hot springs, including Chico Hot Springs near Emigrant, Montana, La Duke Hot Springs near Gardiner, and Hunter's Hot Springs near Livingston.

whitewater rafters, Yankee Jim Canyon
Whitewater Rafting in Yankee Jim Canyon can be a lot of fun if you don't mind getting wet.

An eclectic blend awaits you as you travel through the shops, museums, galleries, and restaurants. From cowboys to culture, from railroads to whitewater, from the historic to the contemporary…

Paradise Valley is the heart of Montana’s fly-fishing and North American big game world. Our creeks, rivers, and alpine lakes are experiences unto itself and our Outfitters and Guides have a history comparable to the glorious land where they work and give you an experience that will last a lifetime.

Take your choice...you may choose to explore the winding scenic trails of Paradise Valley by horseback, or on foot, to soar with eagles as you rise above the Montana horizon and find the spot where Heaven and Paradise On Earth meet.

 

7 Point Ranch

7 Point Ranch offers the comforts of home on the banks of the legendary fly-fishing destination, The Yellowstone River.  The lodge is a repurposed trophy home, not as a bed and breakfast, but better.

The well-appointed rooms have shared common living rooms and kitchens for the guests. You won’t experience that “trapped in a hotel” feeling because you have a living room and kitchen at the end of the hall stocked with some food items and coffee.

Lodge hosts Cheryl and Howard Jones are extremely helpful and full of Information. Cheryl’s hobby is keeping up with wildlife activity in Yellowstone and is a wealth of information about where to see the critters. She also can be hired to show them to you.   More info

buckrail Fence, Yellowstone River Mill Creek, fall, paradise valley, montana
Buckrail Fence, Yellowstone River
Mill Creek, fall, paradise valley, montana
Ranch, Paradise Valley, Montana, mill creek Whitetail deer doe, paradise valley montana
Ranch, Mill Creek, Paradise Valley, Montana,
Whitetail deer doe, Paradise Valley montana
mill creek, snowstorm, fall, paradise valley,montana
Bald eagle, perched above yellowstone river
Mill Creek Snowstorm, Paradise Valley, MT
Bald Eagle watchin for fish in the Yellowstone River
Paradise Valley Fall
Buck, doe, herd, whitetail, deer, paradise valley montana
The Yellowstone River, fall
Herd of whitetail deer in Paradise Valley Montana
Yellowstone News

Tribal Nations sign historic treaty for sacred Grizzly Bear

On Sunday (10/2/16), Native American Tribes from the U.S. and Canada convened at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park to sign a historic treaty to pledge their dedication to protecting the Grizzly bear. Tribes across both countries are angry after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in March proposed removing the Grizzly bear from the federal endangered species list, which would allow the three states to manage the bears and allow hunting.

The treaty entitled, “The Grizzly: A Treaty of Cooperation, Cultural Revitalization and Restoration,” offers innovative and sweeping reforms to hostile management of the states that are poised to wrest control of the fate of Yellowstone’s Grizzly bears if, as expected, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) removes Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections from the Great Bear (“delisting”) later this year. The long battle pits tribes and environmental groups against ranchers and state officials who argue that there are too many bears in the Yellowstone region and they constitute a threat to public safety. ..........................   Rest Of  Article

 

Montana, Wyoming and Idaho Game ad Fish's plan to screw the grizzlies

Wyoming, Montana and Idaho officials contend that federal wildlife managers are overstepping their authority by requiring that grizzly bear hunting regulations be put in place before final “delisting” of the species. The directors of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks jointly urged the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to do away with a focus on hunting in a proposed grizzly delisting rule that’s now on the table. ....... Jackson Hole News and Gude article here.

Montana, Wyoming and Idaho Game ad Fish's protest to get rid of federal oversight so they can kill grizzlies as they see fit...........  Read PDF Here

Momma grizzly, baby grizzly, swimming, grizzly sow, and cub
Grizzly 399 and her cub swimming in roadside pond
Wyoming's Grizzly Harvest

Wyoming's Grizzly Harvest
A preview of the book authored by R. Bear Stands Last.

Discover why Wyoming should not be entrusted with the future survival of the Great Bear in Wyoming's Grizzly Harvest - The Story the State Wants to Bury With the Bears

Wyoming's Grizzly Harvest is excerpted from the forthcoming book Adrift on Yellowstone Island. GOAL has arranged for this excerpt to be provided to you FREE as the grizzly's fate outweighs commercial concerns.

Until April 14, you have the opportunity to comment on Wyoming's draft 2016 Grizzly Bear Management Plan. Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WFGD) representatives are currently traveling statewide to sell the plan and WGFD's ability to "manage" grizzlies post-delisting to you.

Read exerpt

Partisan Scientists in Public Service I: The Strange Case of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

(Pull Qoute) Interestingly enough, Chris Servheen has a doctorate in wildlife ecology. Moreover, the IGBST scientists at the time, led by Dr. Charles Schwartz, were deeply involved with and fully complicit in, not only putting together the 2007 delisting Rule, but also in crafting court briefs. In other words, ignorance or lack of education can't be plausibly invoked as an explanation for why the government scientists involved in authoring the 2007 Rule so egregiously misrepresented the relevant science................. rest of article

http://www.grizzlytimes.org/#!Partisan-Scientists-in-Public-Service-I-The-Strange-Case-of-the-Interagency-Grizzly-Bear-Study-Team/c1ou2/56fd9f780cf2b279cdbaa208
Yellowstone Grizzly Bear

A Protective Firewall For Grizzlies

The delisting of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear is imminent and this we should celebrate (''''dancing''''). Now that our happy dance is complete, we must ensure the grizzlies' recovery is permanent. To ensure "continuity of achievement," the grizzlies need a firewall to protect the success of this achievement from human foible.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee was formed in 1983 to help ensure recovery of viable grizzly bear populations and their habitat in the lower 48 states through interagency coordination of policy, planning, management, and research. Many people have been working on this recovery for decades, for some; it has been most of their career. I can understand why the delisting of the grizzly before their retirement is their goal. A metaphorical gold watch if you will.

Many will argue differently,............................. Rest of Article

Blondie the Grizzly Bear and her three cubs
Blondie the Grizzly Sow and her three cubs, where these four bears roam in the Teton Wilderness is likely to open to hunting someday soon, this must not happen.

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

Helpful ebook for photographers

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

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