Shoshone River, Buttes, sunrise, Cody Wyoming
aritist painting south fork of shoshone river
Tom Bradshaw captures the beauty of the valley of the South Fork of the Shoshone River. You can see Tom's work at his online Gallery

The past is always present in Cody Wyoming. This part of Wyoming represents the last of the true West. Cody is what America was; a place cowboy culture survives the retro heartbeat of the west. The high plains to mountains vista is spectacular, the land is wild, the people are genuinely friendly and the opportunities for outdoor adventure, recreation, education, and entertainment are as large and varied as the Wyoming skies.

Cody has a well-developed hospitality industry with varied lodging opportunities, fine dining, world-class museums and western activities. It is the only Yellowstone gateway community with two entrances to Yellowstone National Park, and Cody is the hub for several loop tour drives that access five different Scenic Byways.

If you’re searching for the real American West, look no further than Cody, Wyoming. Founded in 1896 by that most authentic representative of the Old West, Col. William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, this community of old and new reflects the vision of its founder.

ranch, absaroka mountains, cody wyoming
Wyoming Ranch on the South Fork of the Shoshone River below the Absaroka Mountains

Buffalo Bill lived up to the romantic idea of the brave, daring frontiersman. Through his personal exploits and his Wild West Show he became the world’s most famous American. It is Buffalo Bill Cody's name that represents the essence of the Old West, and has provided a draw to this small western town where real cowboys still herd cattle.

A testament to the legacy of Buffalo Bill Cody are the museums that sprouted in Cody with Buffalo Bill as the inspiration. These museums include The Buffalo Bill Museum examines both the personal and public lives of W.F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody, and seeks to interpret his story in the context of the history and myth of the American West. The Whitney Gallery of Western Art presents an outstanding collection of masterworks of the American West. Original paintings, sculptures, and prints trace artistic interpretations of the West from the early 19th century to today. The Plains Indian Museum features one of the country's largest and finest collections of Plains Indian art and artifacts. Expore the cultural histories, artistry and living traditions of Plains Indian peoples, including the Arapaho, Crow, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Blackfeet, Sioux, Gros Ventre, Shoshone and Pawnee. The Cody Firearms Museum contains the world's most comprehensive assemblage of American arms, as well as European arms dating to the 16th century. The Draper Museum of Natural History integrates the humanities with natural sciences to interpret the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and adjacent intermountain basins. The Harold McCracken Research Library advances the understanding, appreciation, and study of the American West.

Wapati Valley, Cody Wyoming
The Buffalo Bill Scenic Byway goes from Cody to Yellowstone Park, the Wapati Valley is a very scenic section of it.

Cody isand 52 miles east of the Yellowstone National Park's East Entrance, the world’s first national park, and it is about 20 miles east of the Shoshone National Forest, wich is our country’s first national forest. Nestled at the base of the Rocky Mountains, Cody blends spectacularly and unspoiled scenery with outstanding attractions, extensive outdoor recreation, a variety of lodging facilities and restaurants, unique shopping and a bustling business community.

Set against the beautiful backdrop of the eastern escarpment of the Absaroka and Beartooth Mountains, Cody is surrounded by some of the country’s most scenic country. It is ideal for the outdoor enthusiast—camping, hiking, fishing, boating, hunting, whitewater rafting, mountain biking, golfing, rock and ice climbing, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing.

Panoramic views and a plethora of wildlife create some of the most extraordinary scenic drives on earth. The Wapiti Valley, on the Cody road to Yellowstone, the South Fork of the Shoshone and the Sunlight Basin are all home to elk, grizzly and black bears, bighorn sheep, mule deer, moose, bald eagles and a host of other wildlife and birds.

Fly-fisherman, Clarks Fork of theYellowstone River, Cody Wyoming,  Absaroka Beartooth Range
Fly-fishing on the Clarks Fork, South Fork of the Shoshone and the North Fork is a popular activity in Cody Country.

Cody, Wyoming, is home to thousands of lonely trout. The key word for fly-fishing in Cody is solitude. Usually, when we fish around Cody you are pretty much alone. You will not have to fight the crowds as you will in Jackson Hole, Bozeman, West Yellowstone, or many other famous fly-fishing destinations. The lack of fishing pressure does a few things. First, our water doesn't have cynical over educated fish as you might find on the Madison or a popular spring creek, second, there are many high quality fish. It was once said, "famous rivers are there for a reason, to keep people away from the really good ones." In Cody, the fishermen have found this statement to be true. -------------------> More about fishing Cody's rivers and lakes.

Elk hunting is popular outside Cody Wyoming and offers some of the highest bull to cow ratios. It is one of the few places in the country where you can hunt elk with a rifle right in the midst of the rut during the peak of the bugling season. Year after year, trophy bulls meet or exceed the expectations of the most seasoned hunter! Cody has many lakes, and rivers and moose find these to their liking. While many prefer river bottoms, moose may also be found at 9,000 feet or higher near a mountain lake. If you are looking for a trophy buck now is the time and Cody is the place. A trophy mule buck will weigh more than 200 pounds and can get as large as 300 pounds. Behold the sight of 300 to 500 antelopes per day during hunting season, with many bucks over 15 inches! Hunting antelope is exciting and challenging. A typical trophy buck will grow horns of at least 14 inches and makes one of the most beautiful mounts of Wyoming's big game trophies. For hunting quality big horn sheep, Wyoming offers the best. Sheep hunting can be one of the most physically demanding hunts of all the North American species. Hunters, therefore, get the most out of their big horn hunting by being in their best physical condition. --------------------> More about hunting Cody Wyoming

Trophy Bighorn Sheep Ram, Absaroka Mountains, Cody, Wyoming
Wildlife abounds in Cody Country, This Bighorn was found in the North Fork Valley not far from the Yellowstone enterance.

Cody’s whitewater enthusiasts enjoy the Shoshone River the main eastern drainage of Yellowstone National Park. It reads like a flowing history book with almost as many scenic vistas as the colorful people and cultures who explored it. This river was used as a trade route during the fur-trading era for the mountain men and Native Americans who entered the "Yellow Rock" country in pursuit of its abundance of wildlife. This pursuit of adventure continues today.

More than history and the feel of the Old West are present in modern day Cody, Wyoming. Because it’s a tourist destination, Cody has a number of fine restaurants, superb shopping, western design furniture manufacturers and other western artisans, an array of art galleries and a business friendly climate.

Cody's Irma Hotel is listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service, in recognition of its contribution to the cultural foundations of America. Certain exterior walls are made of river rock and locally quarried sandstone from Beck Lake just south of town. The fireplace is an assemblage of rock, ores, minerals, and fossils from the Big Horn Basin. The Irma Hotel is a living museum of the Old West. Buffalo Bill Cody the city’s founder and namesake built and named the hotel for his daughter Irma. You step back into the old West at the Irma Hotel where you'll capture the romance of an era when Cowboys came in from the surrounding ranches and tied their horses to the rail of the hotel. The original part of the hotel was built for Buffalo Bill in 1902. The northwest addition was constructed in 1929, and the southwest addition was added in 1976-1977.

North Fork Shoshone River, Cody Wyoming south fork shoshone river, cody wyoming
North Fork of the Shoshone River outside of Cody Wyoming. South Fork of the Shoshone River outside of Cody Wyoming.
red cliff, cody wyoming gateway to the yellowstone

The juxtaposition between the reds and the greens in Cody Country in spring and early summer is a stunning treat for the eyes.

Metaphorical gateway to Yellowstone
ice climbers, cody wyoming Ice Climbing, cody wyoming
Cody Wyoming is one of the best places anywhere for ice climbing
Irma Hotel backbar a give from queen victoria
The historic bar that the Queen of England gave to Buffalo Bill in 1902. Buffalo Bill later built the Irma Hotel so he would have a place to put thim magnificiant piece of woodwork. The Irma Hotel is a wonderful place to stay while visiting hostoric Cody Wyoming.
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Greater Yellowstone News
Rising Trout
The trout are rising across the Greater Yellowstone.
Yellowstone wildlife closures - a few thoughts
By Daryl L. Hunter

I went to Yellowstone to photograph grizzly bear with three new cubs; it seems as though they are little for so short of a time. In May they are lucky to be 25-pound balls of fur sporting bright curious eyes, and by September they are 50 pounds. The window to capture them is short. After a year of a successful cancer fight I needed some grizzly cub therapy. Upon my arrival to where a grizzly sow had been hanging out I was disappointed my long drive was to be fruitless, the road was closed to stopping and all the turnouts had been blocked so nobody could stop to see the bears.  Now, there weren’t any bears there at the moment, it was just a blanket closure of the area..........................Rest of Article

grizzly photos
Grizzly photo results
Hungry Wolves

Crying wolf, or cause for alarm?

Whether a wolf evokes terror, admiration or curiosity, advocates for the animal are focusing on a single question: Can humans and wolves co-exist in Colorado?

High Country Conservation Advocates (HCCA) in collaboration with the Rocky Mountain Wolf Project hosted a panel discussion this past Friday that revisited the controversial conversation of wolves in the Western United States.However, this time around, wolf advocates are taking the question to the ballot rather than federal and state wildlife managers — with hopes of Colorado voters welcoming the animal. “Colorado is the gap,” .............Rest of articl

National park wants goats gone

By Jerry Painter

Just so you know, Wyoming Game and Fish doesn’t hate mountain goats. But the growth of the non-native critters in the Teton Range is posing a problem that has wildlife managers considering lethal measures. An aerial count this past winter found, for the first time, invasive mountain goats outnumbering native bighorn sheep................Rest of story

 

Mountain Goat
Mountain Goat
Huge Yellowstone Cutthroat trout
Huge Yellowstone Cutthroat trout

Return of the Yellowstone cutthroat trout by Kelsey Dayton

The water in Atlantic Creek in the remote Thorofare region of Yellowstone National Park was clear. So clear that Dave Sweet could see the fish before he even cast. They were everywhere: dozens of beautiful trout with distinctive red slashes under their jaws. Sweet had journeyed for two days on horseback to the major spawning tributaries of Yellowstone Lake for those fish. Over the next few days he and his daughter would see thousands of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and catch some as long as 25 inches. But just as exciting were the younger, smaller fish. They, Sweet realized, mark a turning point in a battle to save a species..................... Rest Of Story

Wild, Tangled Hair
by Anna Vanuga

A cool journey story of Dubois girl now living the dream in Paradise Valley Montana

Most of my life I never considered being able to earn a living as an artist. For years I resisted painting. The only college class I ever dropped was an art course. I would only paint when a rush of inspiration hit me hard enough to alter my short-sightedness. In those moments the painting would just come through me, an abrupt surge of color. It was almost as if my subconscious momentarily shattered a longstanding belief in my capabilities. Once the painting was done the wall would come back up and my brushes would go back to storage for months or years...........Rest of Story

An artists hands, the soul of creativity
An artists hands, the soul of creativity
Wolf Portrait

The Fight Over the Most Polarizing Animal in the West
By Elliott D. Woods

Twenty years after wolves were reintroduced in the Northern Rockies, many politicians would still love to see them eradicated, and hunters and ranchers are allowed to kill them by the hundreds. But the animals are not only surviving—they're expanding their range at a steady clip. For the people who live on the wild edges of wolf country, their presence can be magical and maddening at once.................... Rest of  article

Yellowstone region grizzly bears delisted; see you in court

As announced in June, the U.S. government lifted protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region today, though it will be up to the courts to decide whether the revered and feared icon of the West stays off the threatened species list.The Humane Society of the United States and its affiliate the Fund for Animals, filed a notice of intent on June 30 to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over removing federal protections for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.  Other anti-hunting or animal welfare groups are expected to follow suit, so to speak.................... rest of story

Grizzly Bear Photos
Livingston Montana

The Resort Town Curse
by Daryl L. Hunter

In 1962 as a child my family went through Carmel California, and after my exclaimation how beautiful the place was, my mother explained to me that it was against the law to cut down a tree in the town and it was so beautiful. I wondered why every town didn't do that. A few years later my hometown, San Luis Obispo, did enact all kinds of restricted zoning like Carmel's as a part of an urban renewal plan, and now I couldn't afford to move back there if I wanted to. This town is now populated with what they call "Grey Gold", rich retired people that ran up the property values so high that native born could no longer afford to live there. I have lived in many resort towns since, and I have noticed a trend. I am attracted to them when they are still little, quaint and undiscovered, but it usually isn't long before word spreads about the next great place. ..............   Rest of story

Wild In Captivity?

The term “captive wildlife” seems like such a contradiction in terms. How can creatures that are caged or fenced in and handed their food have any trace of wild life left in them, without the ability to roam far and wide, to hunt or forage, to establish their own territories, search for mates, and keep their distance from other species—all the things that are characteristic of truly wild animals? When people think of wildlife in captivity, they may first think of zoos.  ............................ Rest of you story

A Protective Firewall For Grizzlies
By Daryl L. Hunter

The delisting of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear is imminent and this we should celebrate (''''dancing''''). Now that our happy dance is complete, we must ensure the grizzlies' recovery is permanent. To ensure "continuity of achievement," the grizzlies need a firewall to protect the success of this achievement from human foible.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee was formed in 1983 to help ensure recovery of viable grizzly bear populations and their habitat in the lower 48 states through interagency coordination of policy, planning, management, and research. Many people have been working on this recovery for decades, for some; it has been most of their career. I can understand why the delisting of the grizzly before their retirement is their goal. A metaphorical gold watch if you will.

Many will argue differently,............................. Rest of Article

Blondie the Grizzly Sow and her three cubs, where these four bears roam in the Teton Wilderness is likely to open to hunting someday soon, this must not happen.
Grizzly sow and cub

Yellowstone roadside grizzlies worth rangers' hassle???

Yellowstone visitors would pay an additional $41 to ensure seeing roadside grizzlies, a study shows, and the attraction creates 155 jobs and more than $10 million a year for the regional economy. The $41 visitors would pay is on top of the $25-per-vehicle entrance fee. If Yellowstone no longer allowed grizzly bears to use roadside habitat — and instead chased, moved or killed them — the regional economy would lose more than $10 million a year and 155 jobs according to the paper "The economics of roadside bear viewing."............................Rest of story

Some Yellowstone wolves would be protected under Montana bill

Some wildlife have an “outsized value,” such as wolves that wander from Yellowstone National Park into Montana, argued Sen. Mike Phillips, D-Bozeman, on Thursday. Consequently, those animals should be protected from hunters and trappers in two wolf management units in Park County, which borders Yellowstone..............Rest of story

Three Wolves

Helpful ebook for photographers

The Grand Teton Photo and Field Guide is an encapsulation of the flora, fauna, and photography of Jackson Hole Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park. Also included are thumbnails of the history and geology of the valley. This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park. The author provides general overviews including hot links with more in-depth descriptions of subjects of individual interest.

In the “Lay of the Land” section, includes the obvious highlights along the loop through Grand Teton Park. Hot links to side roads will give you more in-depth description of side roads and feeder roads and their highlights. Also included are descriptions of all two-rut roads that are legal to travel on in Grand Teton Park. GPS links to Google Maps are provided throughout.

As a field guide, profiles of most of animals and birds in the area are described. Jackson Hole is full of wildlife but there are places where animals are, and there are places where they are not. It is a waste of time to scrutinize a landscape devoid of what you are looking for, so this guide narrows options down to the hot spots. I provide maps of the likeliest places to find the popular critters of Grand Teton National Park. I also touch on trees, shrubs, and wildflowers with minimal explanations.  

The grandeur of Grand Teton Park has made it one of the most photographed places in the world. The opportunity to harness multiple juxtapositional elements has drawn photographers for over a century since William Henry Jackson took the first photos here in 1878. Grand Teton Park’s plethora of famous vistas are profiled as well as many which are less clichéd that can bring new perspectives of a well-documented landscape. Grand Tetons’ iconic landscape photo opportunities are described in detail; however, they barely scratch the surface of opportunities as it takes a photographer with an artist’s eye to unveil as they follow their own intuition and vision.  The author who shies away from clichéd landscapes provides a chapter of his favorite places that aren’t landscape clichés.

In the photography section the author includes chapters on composition, exposure basics, when to shoot and why. Daryl has summarized what he teaches in his, half day, Grand Teton workshops in a simple concise way.

If you are only in Grand Teton Park for a day there is a chapter called the “Portfolio Packer Morning Trip,” that does just that, all the icons and several favorite places in a five our blitz.  But it is better to spend more time and dig deep into the embarrassment of riches of Grand Teton National Park................. More Info

 

Wyoming Landscape Collection by Daryl L. Hunter
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